Sunday, 21 April 2013

consequences from the past .....

by Simone McPherson
A while ago I took it upon myself to catalogue the forest trees that we have growing on our property.  Well at the time I thought that it would only be a matter of days perhaps weeks and I would have all of the trees named?  What a foolish idea that was to say the least on my behalf!

We have a woodcutter that has been cutting in this area for years.  He only takes the old dead trees that had been ring barked back in the 1930’s.  I have on occasions when we have come across him, asked him as to the types of Gums that are found here.  

BROAD LEAVED IRONBARK - Eucalyptus fibrosa
NARROW LEAVED IRONBARK - Eucalyptus crebra

GREY BOX - Eucalyptus microcarpa?
Well he can only tell me of the three species that he keeps an eye out for which he cut’s for fire wood and .......

 ........it still mystifies me as to how he does that, as all the dead trees that have been ringbarked all look the same to me.  I cannot work out how he knows what they are.  Even after numerous times in asking him to show me how he can tell as far as I am concerned he has X-Ray vision – I really cannot see the differences in the old trees.   The others that are living, he refers to in his old “slang” which really does not account for Species types at all, for example the – old cabbage tree? – The one with the shiny leaves? Mmmm you get the picture.
TUMBLE GUM
 So it was on one of these occasions over two years ago that I took it upon myself to find out what these trees where?  I did mention - that was two years ago, right? .....

TUMBLE GUM
...... I am still attempting to classify these trees, you see the problem is that they all look very, very similar ....... 

.......though with only very slight differences that, then put them into another category all together and this is where my frustration began and still continues to this day …. 

And El Ranchero does not appreciate the continual “STOP” – I want to look at that tree to see what it is?” – Well he really does not appreciate this demand when we are out working – and as you can see this is a further setback for me? …… well not really, he just gets a little “Short” to say the least?

 I must say, I do have the help of a book that was published back in 1957 then republished in 1984.  It is a wonderful source book for this region – if not terribly dry and very academic with descriptions and jargon.  The book is called – Forest Trees of Australia by Bolard, Brooker, Chippendale, Hall, Hyland, Johnston, Kleinig and Turner – yes they are all Scientist that are associated with the CSIRO...... 

MY PHOTOCOPY OF THE BLACK & WHITE ILLUSTRATIONS  
complete with my scribble
  ....... And the images are all black and white which has been a real challenge for me as well – though I must say that the Scientist have really taken the time to go out in the field and catalogue these trees at different stages of their lives and........

 ....... it has been invaluable with my interpretation of … my understanding to what Species are found here ......

....... as we have a wide variety of different forest regions and terrain classifications on this property which has made the whole project rather interesting for me.

 Already the Department of Land Management and Conservation has classified areas that are not to be cleared as they are old Forest Growth areas or areas that have become very “sensitive” as they were over cleared a long time before we came upon this piece of land – Sheep you see, Marino Sheep that were breed for their Wool. Though no longer of value in this District and I guess, times have changed too; there is no War to support the industry in the form of wool for blankets and clothing for the Soldiers.

 So now we have become Guardians of sorts to the land that we now have and we take this role very seriously......

STORM APPROACHING & MAXI
 .......... as the consequences from the past are still here with us now and we want to rectify them as much as we can with what we do for a living....

........Breeding Cattle for the Cattle Industry here in Australia – we all live together here on this piece of land and we want that to continue into the future for the country at least and it’s native inhabitants.  It can be a fine line to walk at times though ...